from the heart of darkness

too much swag

35 notes

s-c-i-guy:

Chemical Structure Of Different Branded Research Chemicals

This infographic describes the chemical structures of various branded research chemicals.

source

67 notes

ageofdestruction:

elaine: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

First 6 images cover 9°S to 20°S, 129°E to 131°E, showing the centre of Herschel Crater, photographed by MEx, 23rd June 2006.

Last 3 images show the detail highlighted in the 2nd image, photographed by MRO, 16th February 2012.

Image credit: ESA (MEx), NASA/JPL/UoA (MRO). Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

(via s-c-i-guy)

19,763 notes

Tampons were packed with their strings connecting them, like a strip of sausages, so they wouldn’t float away. Engineers asked Ride, “Is 100 the right number?” She would be in space for a week. “That would not be the right number,” she told them. At every turn, her difference was made clear to her. When it was announced Ride had been named to a space flight mission, her shuttle commander, Bob Crippen, who became a lifelong friend and colleague, introduced her as “undoubtedly the prettiest member of the crew.” At another press event, a reporter asked Ride how she would react to a problem on the shuttle: “Do you weep?”

Astronaut Sally Ride and the Burden of Being “The First” (via yahighway)

Men don’t appreciate the amount of self-control women have to exercise in order not to spend their entire lives facepalming.

(via vulvanity)

(Source: dinosaurparty, via hijkevin)

5,632 notes

Let me tell you this: if you meet a loner, no matter what they tell you, it’s not because they enjoy solitude. It’s because they have tried to blend into the world before, and people continue to disappoint them.
Picoult, Jodi. My Sister’s Keeper. (via oceanghosts)

(Source: wordsnquotes, via under-seas)

25,556 notes


Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas

Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas

(via ohkiefer)

3 notes

742365 asked: WELL NOW I HAVE TO ASK FOR A PLAYLIST WITH THAT TAG YOU PUT WHATEVER YOU WANT ON THERE AND I LISTENED TO THE NATIONAL WHEN I DROVE TO AN INTERVIEW AND SANG IN A FAKE BARITONE AND IT WAS VERY CALMING!!!

742365:

epouvante:

hahaha HUHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH YOU ARE READING THIS IN THE VOICE I USE TO PRETEND TO BE HIM HMMMMMMMMM HUHHHH

the theme of this playlist is OHIO AND OHIOANS 5EVER

J - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztmRFhQJJBY

I - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD-9eOWsp8o

L- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VH6yD8zobM

L - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLD1_YtgcoE

I - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tgYr03o3dE

A - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRW-SwQ5ZI8

N - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wi-au14YdE

BEAUTIFUL

34,129 notes

pitbulled:

impactings:

Hey tumblr! Did you know that if you suffer from depression / anxiety or any other mental illness, you can register your dog as an emotional support animal, making it illegal for a landlord to refuse to rent to you? That’s right. No breed restrictions, no weight restrictions, no matter what, they are not allowed to refuse.

This includes cats, rabbits, birds, guinea pigs, etc.!! Go here to register your pet as an ESA :~) 

(via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

767 notes

canidcompendium:

Wolves Might Use Their Eyes to Talk to Each Other
It’s no secret that wolves, foxes, and dogs are highly social animals. But beyond all the wagging, pawing and yipping we like to try to interpret, canids may have yet another way to communicate. New research hints at the possibility that dogs and their ilk could be sending each other signals with their eyes.
A team of Japanese researchers looked at pictures of nearly every canid species and found that those with highly social pack and hunting behaviors were more likely to have easily-visible eyes. They then watched some of those species interact in zoos and concluded that those with eyes that were easier to see were more likely to be social. The results were published in a study in PLoS One on June 11.
“What this study shows is that there’s a correlation between facial markings and sociality and the need to communicate,” said zoologist Patricia McConnell of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a dog behavior researcher who was not involved in the study.
The scientists organized 25 different wild canid species according to their facial features (using around a dozen photos of individuals from each species) into three groups and then looked to previous research to characterize the social behavior of each group.
Read more

canidcompendium:

Wolves Might Use Their Eyes to Talk to Each Other

It’s no secret that wolves, foxes, and dogs are highly social animals. But beyond all the wagging, pawing and yipping we like to try to interpret, canids may have yet another way to communicate. New research hints at the possibility that dogs and their ilk could be sending each other signals with their eyes.

A team of Japanese researchers looked at pictures of nearly every canid species and found that those with highly social pack and hunting behaviors were more likely to have easily-visible eyes. They then watched some of those species interact in zoos and concluded that those with eyes that were easier to see were more likely to be social. The results were published in a study in PLoS One on June 11.

“What this study shows is that there’s a correlation between facial markings and sociality and the need to communicate,” said zoologist Patricia McConnell of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a dog behavior researcher who was not involved in the study.

The scientists organized 25 different wild canid species according to their facial features (using around a dozen photos of individuals from each species) into three groups and then looked to previous research to characterize the social behavior of each group.

Read more

(via scinerds)

1,861 notes

amnhnyc:

This weekend at the Museum: sharks, spiders, and pterosaurs! Oh, my! Whether you consider these creatures frightful or fantastic, you can learn all about them at the Museum right now. 
Here are our favorite posts from the past week:
Don’t worry if you missed the Museum’s #WhaleWash, we posted the footage!
A study led by indigenous people uncovered a grizzly bear ‘highway.’
A diagram that shows our cosmic address at a glance.
Often mistaken for a dinosaur, Dimetrodon was one of the earliest relatives of mammals.
How trapdoor spiders got their name.
A peek into the archives shows the arrival of the Willamette Meteorite to the Museum in 1906!
Have a great weekend!

amnhnyc:

This weekend at the Museum: sharks, spiders, and pterosaurs! Oh, my! Whether you consider these creatures frightful or fantastic, you can learn all about them at the Museum right now

Here are our favorite posts from the past week:

Have a great weekend!

(via scinerds)